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Private Docker Registry Support

By default, installing the Chassis service will push all container images to a public Docker Hub account, which requires you to have valid credentials. If instead you have access to a private Docker registry and prefer your Chassis-built containers get pushed to your own registry, this guide walks through the process (and some examples) of setting up the Chassis service with the proper configuration.

Important Notes

  • Only HTTP API v2 compliant Docker registries are supported
  • This configuration is only available if you deploy and host the service. The publicly-hosted version only pushes public images to your Docker Hub account

Generate Kubernetes Secrets

We first need to generate a Kubernetes secret of type dockerconfigjson that contains Docker registry credentials with push/pull permissions. This command varies slightly depending on your Docker registry.

kubectl create secret docker-registry <registry-secret-name> \
    --docker-server=<private-registry-url> \
    --docker-email=<private-registry-email> \
    --docker-username=<private-registry-user> \
    --docker-password=<private-registry-password>
kubectl create secret docker-registry <registry-secret-name> \
    --docker-server=<AWS-Account>.dkr.ecr.<AWS-region>.amazonaws.com \
    --docker-username=AWS \
    --docker-password=$(aws ecr get-login-password)
kubectl create secret docker-registry <registry-secret-name> \
    --docker-server=<container-registry-name>.azurecr.io \
    --docker-username=<service-principal-ID> \
    --docker-password=<service-principal-password>

We will use the JSON key method to generate a secret with valid GCR credentials. To do so, log into your Google Cloud Console, navigate to your service account and either generate a new JSON key or download an existing JSON key file. Use this file to generate your Kubernetes secret:

kubectl create secret docker-registry <registry-secret-name> \
    --docker-server=<container-registry-name>.gcr.io \
    --docker-username=_json_key \
    --docker-password="$(cat ~/json-key-file.json)"
Replace ~/json-key-file,json with the path to your JSON key file.

Create values.yml file

After our Kubernetes secret is successfully generated, we will need to add this secret to a values.yml file that will ultimately be used to modify a few values in the Chassis helm chart. In this yaml file, we will also specify the URL of our private registry. See examples for the above registry types below:

values.yml
registry:
    url: "<private-registry-url>"
    credentialsSecretName: "<registry-secret-name>"
    repositoryPrefix: ""

image:
    pullPolicy: IfNotPresent
    tag: "1f20586e050416239b055faa18baf35ce5707a32" # Commit hash for latest version of Chassis service
values.yml
registry:
    url: "<AWS-Account>.dkr.ecr.<AWS-region>.amazonaws.com"
    credentialsSecretName: "<registry-secret-name>"
    repositoryPrefix: ""

image:
    pullPolicy: IfNotPresent
    tag: "1f20586e050416239b055faa18baf35ce5707a32" # Commit hash for latest version of Chassis service
values.yml
registry:
    url: "<container-registry-name>.azurecr.io"
    credentialsSecretName: "<registry-secret-name>"
    repositoryPrefix: ""

image:
    pullPolicy: IfNotPresent
    tag: "1f20586e050416239b055faa18baf35ce5707a32" # Commit hash for latest version of Chassis service
values.yml
registry:
    url: "<container-registry-name>.gcr.io"
    credentialsSecretName: "<registry-secret-name>"
    repositoryPrefix: ""

image:
    pullPolicy: IfNotPresent
    tag: "1f20586e050416239b055faa18baf35ce5707a32" # Commit hash for latest version of Chassis service

Install Chassis Service

Now, we just need to use our newly generated values.yml file to install the Chassis service using helm.

helm install chassis chassis/chassis -f values.yml

Visit this Installation guide for full installation details.

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